Thank You

Good Thursday morning. I hope this week has given you a few things to be thankful for. Today is the start of the last month of the year 2011. If you’re following any of the superstitions that say the world is ending in 2012, you might be getting nervous now. Or maybe you are recovering after it was supposed to end two times in 2011, according to one family radio pastor.

As I have said before, I am starting to set up my life so that in December each year, I do only fun things, spend time with family and plan for the coming year. This week’s focus has been five words or phrases that you want to hear when you finish something, be it a project, or a goal, or a whole year. We all love to hear reinforcements that encourage us. We’ve touched on three of them already. Today we are going to cover the saying, “Thank you.”

In the mid ‘90s I worked at a car dealership in King of Prussia, PA. It was owned by David Penske, the younger brother of racing expert, Roger Penske. I mention him and his dealership because of one important thing that I learned while I was there. Each year, on the last day we worked before Christmas, at the end of the day we all gathered around in the service shop of the dealership. David Penske personally came down with envelopes in hand, and stood beside a van that was loaded down with frozen turkeys. Some looked forward to getting an envelope with a check in it for a bonus, others relied each year on that turkey for their family Christmas dinner. For me, the most significant part of that day each year was when Mr. Penske walked up to each of us, called us by name, shook our hand while giving us the envelope and said: “Thank you for your service this year.” Wow! The owner of the company came out of his office to personally shake my hand and say, “Thanks.”

I know we are in a big corporate world today and many will be lucky to get an email from the president or owner of their company. How much would that handshake and the owner of the company personally telling me “thank you” mean now? In those days, I was just a car wash and prep person on the body shop. All I did was wash the cars after they were painted and get them ready for customers to pick up. For that he said, “Thank you for doing what you do.” That made me feel like my job, no matter how small or insignificant it might sometimes seem, was important to him.

Now let’s apply this to our lives. I don’t care who it is in your life and what they do for you. When is the last time you told someone, “Thank you”? The person who mows your lawn, the person who cleans your house. The maid at the hotel you are staying at, the man who picks up the trash from your house. We can never hear the words “thank you” enough. We all have jobs in this world and at times they are thankless jobs. Rather than tell you to put together a gift for all those people who have served you like those listed above, develop a habit during the next year of thanking them each time you see them. See how the services you get improve over the next year as a result.

We all need to hear it more and, like the old biblical concept that says if you want more friends, be friendlier, if you want to be thanked more often tell more people “thank you” for what they do or give to you.

A few years ago when I was buying parts for a truck repair shop I dealt with a tire dealer named Brian. This is why I remember him: each time I bought something from him I thanked him for helping me find what I needed and getting it to me. He would always stop me and say, “No, thank you for giving me your business.” He was always thankful for the customers he had and treated then with thanks for the fact they gave him their dollars in business. So take these words to your world: Thank you.

And thanks for reading. After all, you – my readers – are the reason I have this blog. I’m Tim Gillette, the Rocker Life Coach. It’s time to live your dream, to love what you do and those you share life with. Develop a habit of saying “thank you” and soon you will be considered the RockStar in your world.

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